Article

The Influence of Belief in Offender Redeemability and Decision‐Making Competence on Receptivity to Restorative Justice

Author
  • Gregory D. Paul (Kansas State University)

Abstract

Restorative justice (RJ) processes offer a way to address multifaceted harms caused by wrongdoing. Yet, questions remain about people’s attitudes toward restorative processes such as victim–offender conferences (VOCs) and the factors that influence those attitudes. This study examined whether beliefs about youth and adult redeemability and decision‐making competence influence perceptions of justice outcomes, VOC effectiveness, VOC appropriateness, VOC support, and VOC participation willingness. Analysis of survey data gathered from 207 participants through Amazon MTurk suggests that perceived redeemability and to a lesser extent decision‐making competence significantly shape outcome‐ and process‐related beliefs and evaluations. Namely, the more people believe that offenders are redeemable, the more they are likely to support restorative outcomes, perceive VOCs to be effective and appropriate, support the use of VOCs, and be willing to participate in a VOC. The study’s findings are useful for potentially shaping people’s understanding of and support for RJ.

Keywords: decision‐making competence, redeemability, stereotypes, restorative justice

How to Cite:

Paul, G., (2021) “The Influence of Belief in Offender Redeemability and Decision‐Making Competence on Receptivity to Restorative Justice”, Negotiation and Conflict Management Research 14(1). doi: https://doi.org/10.34891/hap6-y266

734 Views

723 Downloads

Published on
27 Feb 2021
Peer Reviewed